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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

10 edition of Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest. found in the catalog.

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest.

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest.

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Published by Printed by order of the Trustees of the British museum, by R. Taylor in [London] .
Written in

    Subjects:
  • Achilles (Greek mythology) -- Poetry

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEd by William Cureton, M.A.
    GenrePoetry.
    ContributionsCureton, William, 1808-1864, ed., British Museum. Dept. of Manuscripts.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsZ115Z .H7
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 129, [1] p.
    Number of Pages129
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6531563M
    LC Control Number11014403
    OCLC/WorldCa5087251

    WILLIAM CURETON (), English Orientalist, was born at Westbury, in Shropshire. After being educated at the free grammar school of Newport, and at Christ Church, Oxford, he took orders in , became chaplain of Christ Church, sublibrarian of the Bodleian, and, in , assistant keeper of MSS. in the British Museum. The Iliad, a major founding work of European literature, is usually dated to around the 8th century BC, and attributed to Homer. It is an epic poem, written in Ancient Greek but assumed to be derived from earlier oral sources, and tells much of the story of the legendary Trojan War between mainland Greece and the city of Troy in Asia Minor.

    Homer's ''Iliad'' is an epic poem with a broad story, but it's also filled with creative lines and poetic turns of phrase. In this lesson, you will learn about a variety of examples of figurative. William Cureton ( – 17 June ) was an English Orientalist.. Life. He was born in Westbury, being educated at the Adams' Grammar School in Newport, Shropshire and at Christ Church, Oxford, he took orders in , became chaplain of Christ Church, sublibrarian of the Bodleian, and, in , assistant keeper of manuscripts in the British Museum.

    The Iliad of Homer - Book 16 study guide by Matthew_Ye63 includes 20 questions covering vocabulary, terms and more. Quizlet flashcards, activities and games help you improve your grades. Start studying English Iliad - Book 1. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.


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Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest by Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac Palimpsest book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This scarce antiquarian book is a 4/5(3). Homer. Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest. [London] Printed by order of the Trustees of the British museum, by R.

Taylor, (OCoLC) Named Person: Achilles, (Mythological character); Achilles, (Mythological character) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Homer.; William Cureton; British Museum. In the preface to a late publication (), Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syrian Palimpsest, edited by William Cureton, the editor tells us: " The Palimpsest Manuscript, in which I discovered these fragments of a very ancient copy of the Iliad of Homer, formed a part of the library of the Syrian convent of St.

Mary Deipara, in the. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Addeddate Bookplateleaf Call number AER Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II External-identifier urn:oclc:record FoldoutcountPages: Genre/Form: Poetry: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Homer.

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest. [London] Printed by order of the. This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world’s books discoverable online.

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest Author. The Iliad Book XXII: The Death of Hector. Homer $ - $ The Golden Chain of Homer. Homer $ Circe and the Cyclops. Homer The First Six Books of Homer's Iliad: The Original Text Reduced to the Natural English Order, with a Literal Interlinear Translation Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac Palimpsest () Homer.

Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac Palimpsest () by Homer,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Homerica: The Little Iliad (Fragments) translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White [] Fragment #1 --Proclus, Chrestomathia, ii: Next comes the "Little Iliad" in four books by Lesches of Mitylene: its contents are as follows.

The adjudging of the arms of Achilles takes place, and Odysseus, by the contriving of Athena, gains them. 2 Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac Palimpsest (London ) pp. xviii, 23, In the standard lists of Homeric uncials Syr.

= Pap. It is Brit. Mus. Add. 3 Homerische Bl?tter Vol. I (Bonn ) pp. esp. ; first publ. in Monatsbericht Berl. Akad. Homer achieves his effect largely through an exchange of narratives, which illuminate Achilles’ upbringing and hint at his ultimate fate beyond the scope of the epic.

Ostensibly, each side presents these stories to persuade the other side, but Homer uses them to humanize Achilles. Although attributed to Homer, “The Iliad” is clearly dependent on an older oral tradition and may well have been the collective inheritance of many singer-poets over a long period of time (the historical Fall of Troy is usually dated to around the start of the 12th Century BCE).

Homer was probably one of the first generation of authors who were also literate, as the Greek alphabet was Ratings: Analysis. The Achaeans’ success so far despite Achilles’ absence, along with Paris’s cowardice and Hector’s hopeless despair in Book 6, have seemed to spell doom for theby the end of Book 8, we recall the Achaeans’ bravado with great has nearly seized their ambitious fortifications, and the Trojans appear more determined than ever.

Such involved descriptions of weaponry are common in both the Iliad and the Odyssey. The technique is also used in later epics, such as the long histories of the swords in the great Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf.

Humor in the Iliad is most often associated with the gods but does occasionally show up among the humans, most often in connection with. Attributed to a sightless poet simply known as Homer, of which little is known, this epic poem was most probably created over several centuries, perhaps during the so-called Geometric Age (c.

BCE), by many authors in an oral tradition, before the adoption of writing, when it was not uncommon to be able to recite (or sing), verbatim. Throughout the Iliad, many of the characters have aristeias; Book V is the aristeia of Diomedes.

Book V, sometimes referred to as the Diomedia, has its own internal unity and may once have constituted an independent poem, or bardic lay, about the exploits of the Achaian hero Diomedes, which was adapted by Homer and included in the Iliad.

Homer. The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd.

The Annenberg CPB/Project provided support for entering this text. Purchase a copy of this text. Homer has books on Goodreads with ratings. Homer’s most popular book is The Iliad (Translated, Annotated, Illustrated, Quotes). Homer: Fragments of the Iliad of Homer from a Syriac palimpsest.

([London] Printed by order of the Trustees of the British museum, by R. Taylor, ), also by British Museum. Dept. of Manuscripts, ed. by William Cureton (page images at HathiTrust) Homer: Froschmäusekrieg. Bk I Invocation and Introduction.

Goddess, sing me the anger, of Achilles, Peleus’ son, that fatal anger that brought countless sorrows on the Greeks, and sent many valiant souls of warriors down to Hades, leaving their bodies as spoil for dogs and carrion birds: for thus was the will of Zeus brought to fulfilment.

Sing of it from the moment when Agamemnon, Atreus’ son, that king of. CURETON, WILLIAM (–), English Orientalist, was born at Westbury, in Shropshire. After being educated at the free grammar school of Newport, and at Christ Church, Oxford, he took orders inbecame chaplain of Christ Church, sub-librarian of the Bodleian, and, inassistant keeper of MSS.

in the British Museum.It's not a mistake that Book I of Homer's Iliad is often called "The Quarrel." As you can see, the head military leader of the Greeks, Agamemnon, is made to return a prisoner due to Achilles's wiles. Achilles, in his anger, asks the goddess Thetis for Jove's help in chastising the Greeks by aiding the Trojans.